Photography

Roles of fire photography

To better understand the reasons for which the Association is trying to promote the acknowledgment of the work fire photographers do and the importance of establishing close relationships between fire photographers and emergency services, here is a list of the roles of fire photography for all parties involved:

Roles for the fire department

  1. Showcasing the work of a fire department (improving the department's image)
  2. Showcasing the work of firefighters, providing a stimulating work environment
  3. Chronological documentation of a fire's evolution, usually from very early during the incident, often before the first backup units arrive
  4. Producing images for firefighting training
  5. Producing images for fire prevention training
  6. Producing images for the department's archives
  7. Documenting the work of firefighters for debriefing, incident response post-analysis, focus on specific issues encountered during an incident response, and more

Roles for the police service

  1. Documenting an incident site from very early during an incident (often before extrication begins), providing images that can be very useful to investigations
  2. Producing images that include bystandards at various times during an incident, which can be useful to criminal fire investigations

Roles for the fire photographer

  1. Major challenges in photography technique (action speed, lighting, etc.), providing the photographer with an extremely stimulating work environment and opportunities to improve his photography skills
  2. Authorship of unique and spectacular photographs, showcasing not only his photography skills but also his abilities to work in collaboration with emergency services

Roles for victims and their families

  1. Victims: Possibility to get photographs of their own accident, which often helps surpass psychological effets of such a traumatic event.
  2. Families of deceased victims: Possibility to get photographs of the accident of a family member, which often helps during mourning.
2017 Quebec Fire Photographers Association (QFPA)